Bavarian Alps

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The term Bavarian Alps in its wider sense refers to that part of the Alps that lies on Bavarian state territory in Germany. However it is usually understood that the Bavarian Alps are only those ranges between the rivers Lech and Saalach in Germany. In this narrower sense, the Allgäu Alps, which have only been part of Bavaria in more recent times, and the Berchtesgaden Alps are not considered part of the Bavarian Alps.